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Madison Wisconsin- The Protest Continues

March 22, 2011 3 comments

Capitol Square

I arrived in Madison WI on Saturday March 19th. When I got to Capital Square there were several hundred protesters walking around the Capitol Building. This is a small number compared to the week before, when at least 200,000 people had descended upon the capitol to welcome the 14 senators who had fled the state several weeks earlier to prevent Governor Walker’s union busting bill from being passed. They left because the GOP dominated senate still need them to create the necessary quorum for a vote on any bill that is primarily fiscal in nature. In the end, Walker had tried to do an end run by saying that the “Budget Repair Bill” had nothing to do with money. So the senate passed the bill without the 14 and without the required 24 hour notice. There was an immediate legal challenge which the governor lost and has now appealed. Now focus is on recalling him and his cronies.

But, even with fewer numbers the signs of protest were everywhere, and the protesters themselves were filling up every café and bar as they ended their day with some hard earned refreshment.

At that point I had checked into the local hostel, and though I no longer had three days of road grime on me I still had not slept in some time. The moon was full that night, and I decided to go find some food. The first people I met were a couple of local progressives that had been here for the whole thing. I will never forget sitting there at the Old Fashioned across from the capitol as the sun went down. They bought me a couple of beers and shared their dinner with me as they explained some of the fine points of Wisconsin politics. I can’t remember everything we discussed, but I do remember feeling so much better after a hard three day ride. Also, I learned that the place I needed to go was Williams Street (Willy to the locals) and there I would find a great thrift store, a food co-op, and plenty of good coffee.

Everywhere I go in this town people are talking about this. I asked a woman in a bar what her favorite thing was about the protests. She replied that it was the amazing sense of community. For several weeks there had been a little city

Everywhere There Are Signs

within a city in Capitol Square. People from all over the world, including Egypt, were sending food for the protesters. An amazing gift economy sprang up. For her, it was the community. But her friend had a different idea. He said he loved it that no matter where you went in town, everyone was taking part, even as they went about the mundane business of living. If you saw someone taking out the trash, they would be wearing a recall Walker t-Shirt. A baby stroller passing you miles from the square would be sporting a Kill the Bill sign. There were and are signs everywhere.

A bartender at a brew-pub across the street from the hostel told me about the day Walker pulled the skullduggery. Everyone was getting ready to go collect signatures for the recall effort when he got a tweet to get to the square right away. By the time he arrived there were 10,000 people. The capitol building is supposed to be the people’s house. It is supposed to be open to the public. In the first several weeks of the protest people had been sleeping inside the building. Then the governor had ordered the building cleared for “cleaning” and pushed everyone out. Now, people were pushing back in again. The police, whose sympathies were clearly with the protesters, would leave one entrance unguarded as they rushed to another. Many officers would change in to protest t-shirts as soon as they got off shift. Now, all but one entrance to the building is nailed shut.

Don't Mess with the Badger

Yesterday I walked up to Willy Street and finally got completely full at the salad bar at the food co-op. I got into a conversation with a substitute teacher who filled me in on the process for doing a recall. As the conversation developed we began to get into the psychological and philosophical problems presented by the dirty politics of the 21st century. She said she believed that Scott Walker is a sociopath, and I concur. When it comes to voting, people on the left are so often left with voting for an ineffectual or corrupt representative to keep a patently insane candidate from winning. But I have come to understand that though the candidate may be insane, and the citizens who vote for the candidate may be duped, the ones financing the whole thing are neither crazy nor stupid. They are just plain evil, and they have a well thought out plan that they have been in the process of implementing it for a long time. The great instability we are experiencing now is the end game. As we discussed this we began to wonder aloud-What makes a multi-billionaires so discontent with their lives that they have to go after even more of the available resources in the world? Why can’t they be happy and gracious and pay their fair share gladly? Why do they need ever more power and money, grabbed at the expense of those less fortunate? Why do they want to consign the entire world but themselves to slavery or starvation? And that, my friend, is the very definition of an imponderable.

 

San Francisco-Days One and Two

The Journey Begins

The trip began in a light rain, which seems appropriate. My first stop is San Francisco. I have been doing a lot of walking, getting the lay of the land. It is an interesting phenomenon. I know this city, have lived in it years ago and around it for what seems like forever. But now I am observing closely, looking with new eyes. I am staying with friends, and the time I spend at the home base is companionable as we share a meal or a bottle of Zinfandel. But I can see that this will be a lonely venture.

On the Road

I spent the day in the Union Square area yesterday, checking in at the dying Borders Books where they are having a closing sale—“Everything Must Go!” Including the employees, who will soon be battling astounding odds as they try to find new jobs.

In the evening I went to a Couchsurfing.com event at a local watering hole, the Café Royale.The way couch surfing works I have a better chance of finding places to stay along the way if I have people to vouch for me, and a few couch surfing “friends” on the website. The people were really great. There were a lot more men than women at first, but by 9:30 PM it had evened out a bit. They came from all over the world. It is a truly international crowd. I may have been the oldest person there but it was not an issue. And I have my first Couch Surfing friend, a young

Everything Must Go!

man from Santa Cruz who is in the process of moving to San Francisco. This may actually work.

Meanwhile, in other news, Governor Walker of Wisconsin by passed the need for a quorum which he couldn’t achieve without the fourteen Democrats who left the state three weeks ago, and used some procedural skullduggery to push the union-busting bill through. That leaves me with a little logistics problem. I want to go to Madison first thing, but my plan was to go south and cover California first. It takes a little over two days to get to Madison WI from san Francisco by bus. I am torn…